Kempsey Shire Council to receive $58,600 funds for weed management

Menace: Council has received funding to remove weeds such as tropical soda apple from crown lands in the shire.
Menace: Council has received funding to remove weeds such as tropical soda apple from crown lands in the shire.

Coastal Corridor and Riparian Weeds Project

Kempsey Shire Council has received a total of $58,600 in funding from the Department of Primary Industries – Crown Lands under the Public Reserves Management Fund Program to assist with weed management projects across the region.

Council will use $20,000 of the funds to undertake the Coastal Corridor and Riparian Weeds Project to target weeds such as cockspur coral tree, groundsel bush, bitou bush and lantana on Crown Land from Grassy Head to Gladstone.

Council’s weeds officer Greg Egan, said the project has been developed in partnership with DPI – Crown Lands. “This project follows on from similar weed management work Council has recently undertaken on crown lands in Stuarts Point and South West Rocks and the funding means we can continue our management efforts,” Mr Egan said.

“Council will have weed contractors on the ground as well as aerial spraying to control infestations of high risk species from Grassy Head to Gladstone.”

Tropical soda apple a target

The additional $38,600 of funding will be used to help council undertake strategic ground control works to eradicate tropical soda apple (TSA) on Crown Lands.

Also known as ‘the weed from hell,’ TSA is a highly aggressive, prickly shrub that spreads quickly and impacts agricultural land, forests, riparian zones, roadsides and parks, displacing native or existing plants. 

“The TSA project will see specialist contractors engaged to target 245 hectares of crown lands adjacent to the Macleay River using chemical and manual methods,” Mr Egan said.

“Council will also work in conjunction with local landholders who have been proactive in their efforts in monitoring and eradicating TSA from their properties.

“By targeting highly invasive weeds such as TSA as early as possible means we are able to improve native species habitats in order to improve their rehabilitation and increase their resilience.”